Land Your Ideal Clients with a Laser-Focused SEO Strategy

Here is a guest blog post by Dustin Christensen, the digital marketing manager for JacksonWhite Law, one of the largest firms in Phoenix’s East Valley.


A recent study revealed that nearly 50 percent of all web traffic comes from search engines, and no matter what area of law you practice, chances are good that people are looking for your services online.

Even in competitive areas like bankruptcy or criminal defense, it’s possible to craft a long-term search engine optimization strategy that can consistently target your ideal client. So how do you do it?

Provide Value to Those Who Need it Most

Emphasize the needs of your clients by offering resourceful, practical pages on your website. Potential clients will be more likely to see you as a trusted leader, even if it’s just in your community. Focus less on a sales pitch and more on providing value that acts as a gateway to a longer relationship.

One way to do this is to break down complex legal information, such as statutes, into easy-to-digest charts and tables. This can be much easier to comprehend than reading a list of definitions, penalties and the like.

When you provide this type of value to potential clients, you don’t have to spend as much time on your call to action – you’ve showed visitors how valuable you are rather than simply telling them.

Valuable content helps both your target clients and Google decide what your services are about. This can weed out visitors that aren’t interested in your services, and the quality of leads coming to your site will increase because you’ve offered specific resources instead of broad, sweeping statements.

Don’t Be Afraid to Get too Specific

Many SEO strategies start out broad: you may want to rank for “criminal defense attorney” in your city, or some variation. The only problem? So do hundreds of other lawyers in your area. The reward may be great, but so is the competition.

To see results faster, try getting more specific. Instead of targeting broad terms, consider going after specific keywords based on your areas of expertise. If you take criminal speeding cases, for example, consider creating pages based on specific topics, such as “criminal speeding laws in (your state or city).”  

Generally, the more specific your keyword targeting, the less competition you face. There may be fewer people searching for criminal speeding laws than criminal attorneys, but those who are will be extremely high quality potential leads that have a much better chance of becoming clients.

Understanding What Google Wants

Google, and other search engines, are in the business of providing accurate and relevant information to its visitors. They do that by only showing sites that the search engine believes to be the best match to the visitor’s search.

In simplified terms, when you provide value and extremely targeted content, you have a better chance of being seen as the best “answer” to a visitor’s query. Creating this value can be challenging, but it’s a marketing asset that will help target your ideal client for years to come.


 

Tags:
Trackbacks (0) Links to blogs that reference this article Trackback URL
http://blog.larrybodine.com/admin/trackback/302553
Comments (2) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Collin - July 11, 2013 7:55 AM

You've offered a lot of great advice. I have noticed that law firm SEO is a great opportunity for firms to reach a larger range of people. I definitely agree when you emphasize value. It's so important that the content you use for SEO is relevant, engaging and informative.

David - November 15, 2013 6:29 PM

I think you've really hit the nail on the head. A long-tail strategy is definitely the way to go. Gone are the days when prospective clients type "Phoenix DUI Lawyer" into Google. Now they are looking for "lawyer for DUI in Tempe BAC .12" or as you said laser focused.

Excellent post on a great subject.

Post A Comment / Question Use this form to add a comment to this entry.







Remember personal info?
Send To A Friend Use this form to send this entry to a friend via email.