2 Ways to Improve Your Law Practice's PPC Advertising

Today we hear from Sarah Kicinski, a CMO in the direct mail business about Pay Per Click advertising.


As Chief Marketing Officer at PostcardMania, I am responsible for staying on top of our Pay Per Click (PPC) marketing. One day our PPC expert reported that we had paid for a click from someone who typed "How to Get on McDonald's Mailing List” into Google. This was a complete waste of money, because obviously that prospect doesn’t want a targeted mailing list; he wants coupons for cheeseburgers, and we just can’t help him with that.

These dead-end leads drive PPC marketers crazy, because they eat up your return on investment! I decided to put an end to the problem once and for all, so we could seal up our marketing and keep out dead-end leads. I only want to pay for leads that have a good chance of bringing my company revenue. You want the same thing for your law practice, so I want to tell you what I came up with. It worked for us, and it will work for you.

Here’s what you do:

1. Use Negative Keywords to Keep Unqualified Leads Away From Your Ads.

PPC works by targeting specific keywords, so your ads get shown to prospects that are already looking for your services. Law practices would target keywords like “legal advice,” “personal injury lawyer,” etc. We call these keywords positive keywords, because they are targeting the people you DO want to see your ads. Negative keywords are the phrases that may lead unqualified leads to your ads. Those are the keywords used by people you DO NOT want to see your ads, because they may click on them before realizing you don’t have what they need. You need to intentionally specify that Google should block leads from negative keywords, because otherwise they may be shown to the wrong prospects, just like what happened in our McDonald mailing list story. The search had “mailing list” in it, so it was technically related to our business. However, the prospect clearly wasn’t looking for targeted mailing lists for marketing purposes, so there wasn’t really a sales opportunity there. Using negative keywords keeps these dead-end leads away, and only shows your ads to prospects with a potential for revenue generation.

2. Use Analytics to Track Which Ads Are Generating Revenue, Not Just Leads

Just because an ad is attracting quality leads doesn’t necessarily mean it’s bringing your practice revenue. Tracking which ads are resulting in real revenue, not simply attracting interest, helps you to see which keywords are your best investments and which ad strategies are the most effective. Even if you’re avoiding dead-end leads, that doesn’t mean you’re necessarily heading in the right direction. You need to proactively track your revenue generation to make sure you are driving on the road to profit-ville.

Dead-end leads are the worst. You’re paying for marketing with no hope of a return on the investment. These two methods help you get rid of dead-end leads and maximize the revenue your ads generate for your law practice.

If you would like more advice on maximizing your PPC efforts, download this free report with 12 more tips for increasing PPC targeting.

Sarah Kicinski is the Chief Marketing Office of direct mail marketing firm, PostcardMania. In the 9 years since she started, Sarah has worked her way through several high-level positions and closely overseen PostcardMania’s transformation from a turnkey direct mail marketer offering graphic design, printing, mailing list acquisition and mailing services all under one roof, to a fully integrated marketing firm with a full suite of print, digital and delivery products.

In 2012, PostcardMania reached almost $44 million in annual revenue, and the company now employs more than 195 people, prints 4 million and mails 2 million postcards each week, and has more than 53,000 customers in over 350 industries. Please visit www.postcardmania.com for more information. You can find Sarah on Google+, or call 1-800-628-1804 to speak with a PostcardMania marketing consultant. 

5 Must Haves For Your Website Conversion Tool Kit (Webinar)

Attention Attorneys: You have only 6 seconds to make a connection with a website visitor.

Six short seconds from the time a visitor lands on your website to let them know what you're focusing on, how you can help them, and ultimately to prompt an inquiry from them.

Even if you drive thousands of visitors to your website every day, that traffic is of very little value to your law firm if you're not converting those visitors into inquiries.

Ready to make changes to your website that will prove results?  Join Cindy Greenway, Editor in Chief of LawMarketing.com and Tanner Jones, Marketing Director of ConsultWebs.com on Thursday, September 12th at 1pm Eastern / 10am Pacific, for a complimentary webinar.

5 Must Haves For Your Website Conversion.

Here's what you learn when you join us for this webinar:

  1. Five top items you MUST have on your website to convert visitors to prospects
  2. How to design for human eyes:  ensuring you are approachable
  3. Proven ways to maximize your website conversion
  4. Which data is worth tracking and how it impacts your bottom line
  5. The top conversion tools that are critical for today's Web browsers

This webinar is complimentary. Click here to register.

Advice on the Importance of a Law Firm's Reputation

I was recently interviewed by Carole Oldroyd of the Reputation.com Blog on the importance of the law firm's reputation. You can read the interview below or on the Reputation.com Blog.

Every business wants to have a good reputation, but the nature of a lawyer's work demands it. Attorneys have been understandably slow and cautious in promoting themselves online. But clients are consumers, and consumer needs and expectations evolve.

Can opting not to build an online presence hurt?

Based on new research by TRiG, The Research Intelligence Group, more than three-quarters of adults who looked to hire an attorney in the past year went online at some point in the process.

If consumers fail to find an online presence, they will form a poor opinion of the firm, in my opinion.

How safe is it to believe that the firm doesn't have an online presence if no one inside the firm created one?

The firm will have a reputation -- and an online presence -- regardless if the firm endeavored to create one because consumers exchange opinions.

Worse, the Web is full of "trolls" who have nothing better to do than say negative things -- and an easy target is a firm with no established online presence. Therefore, it is crucial for a firm to claim and establish its reputation by actively creating an online presence.

Is social media an important factor?

Social media has become a popular form of conversation among consumers since LinkedIn was launched in 2003, Facebook was launched in 2004, and Twitter was launched in 2006.

There is a continuous, influential stream of messages being sent about lawyers and law firms. The conversation can generate new business for firms that participate, or it can send new business to competitors for law firms that ignore the conversation.

How can a firm monitor its reputation and measure the results?

The most important important metric of a positive reputation is the amount of revenue generated. Offline sources of business are notoriously hard to measure. Online sources, however, can be measured and compared easily:

  • Unique visitors and page views for a website.
  • Number of views and leads generated by an online profile
  • Followers and re-tweets for a Twitter account
  • Likes for a Facebook page
  • Recommendations for a LinkedIn profile

Using Reputation.com is a good option to monitor reputation. The best place to monitor is the online venue that clients and potential clients visit.

How can a firm manage occasional negative feedback?

Stifle the natural urge to counterattack; the better approach is to be sensitive and accommodating. The key is never to respond in anger. Even if the commenter is not satisfied, at least you have shown that you are the more reasonable person.

At some point it will make sense to let it die out. At that stage, the only option is to flood the web with "good news" using SEO techniques. Negative comments will appear out of sight.

Can posting videos on YouTube enhance a firm's reputation?

There is nothing more convincing than appearing "in person" to demonstrate good will. Good production values and frequent postings make a big difference here.

On Lawyers.com, we have helped hundreds of lawyers create playlists of positive messages about their practices on YouTube. These videos emphasize how a law firm works and how it proceeds with a legal matter. Sound and motion capture people's attention, and a relevant, helpful message will keep an audience.

How can lawyers drive online traffic?

There is a science to optimizing search engine results for websites and blogs. But in the final analysis, nothing beats fresh new content and unique perspectives.

Readers may be hooked by promoted tweets or online marketing, but only a good story with a practical point will keep and hold clients and new customers.

Are there third-party options to help lawyers get established?

It has become desirable for lawyers to engage marketing and writing professionals to create their web pages and initial drafts of blog posts. For example, many lawyers turn to LexisNexis Custom Web Visibility Solutions to interview them and use the information to write practice descriptions and web copy that attracts new business.

For the copy and content to be authentic, a lawyer must be personally involved in the final expression. This taps into the personality of a lawyer, who will be a better editor than creator of content.

 

Law Firms: Big Brands Mean Big Business

If there is any doubt about the power of a big brand, check out Graphic Design USA’s recent listing of the favorite logos of the past half century.  Even those that are abstract symbols are easily recognized by millions across the globe.  These brands have gained popularity over many years and consumers choose these companies’ products because they believe in the brand - a strong brand can generate fierce customer loyalty.

 

When someone needs the services of an attorney, the company brand will heavily influence their final choice.   People are used to making choices based on branding – they are bombarded by brands every waking minute of their day, from adverts and product packaging, to television and the ubiquitous internet.   So when seeking legal representation they will automatically assess law firms’ brands and will be attracted to the brand which appears to match their specific needs.

If a law office brand doesn’t send out the right message to the prospective client right from the very first viewing, quite simply its attorneys won’t be hired.  When branding your law office, follow these guidelines to ensure that you have a big brand that will bring you plenty of business:

Use a Professional Branding Company:  This critical step can’t be over emphasized.  A brand is far more than an eye catching logo; a powerful company brand summarizes everything you offer and how you deliver it.  By working with seasoned professionals you can develop a strong branding strategy that reflects your professionalism, your ethics, your experience and expertise.  A big brand will form a firm foundation for all your promotional activities.

Define your Target Market:  A full and complete understanding of your target market is necessary for your brand to be effective.  It must appeal to your audience and make them sit up and take notice.

Define your Unique Selling Point:  Be clear on what makes you different from your competitors.  Maybe you have a great track record in winning your cases.  Whatever it is, make sure it is highly evident in all of your promotional materials.

Choose an Appropriate Company Name:  Partner names can be used but only in moderation, and are far more effective when combined with the area of legal specialization.  ‘Dale & Docherty Family Law’ definitely works.  However ‘Smith, Lewis, Docherty & Slopecki Criminal & Family Lawyers’ is starting to push any reader’s attention span to its limit and is far from memorable.  More creative names are also acceptable so long as they reflect the services on offer.

Design a Memorable Logo:  Your company logo will be shown on everything from your business card and corporate stationery to your website and traditional adverts.  So use a professional brand company to get it right.  A logo which appears unrelated to legal services or is clearly an amateur design certainly won’t instill trust in your would-be clients.

Create a Strong Tagline:  Your company tagline is a short phrase to set the stage for what you offer and to entice the reader to learn more.  It can be traditional and formal, or more modern such as that used by Foster Townsend Graham & Associates, the Canadian firm who opted for ‘Damn Fine Litigators’.  It’s succinct, to the point and definitely memorable.

Produce High Quality Printed Materials:  To make a good impression, your business cards, corporate stationery and company brochures must all be professionally designed and printed on quality paper.  For many this is an indication of your success - and clients will always want to hire successful attorneys.

As with any other product or service, consumers are persuaded to hire an attorney in part by the company brand.  A well thought out branding strategy created in conjunction with a professional brand development company is imperative for your law firm.  By creating an effective brand, it has the capacity to grow into a well known brand – and big brands definitely drum up big business.


About the author: Michelle Collins is an experienced writer in the field of brand design and website development, and works for New Design Group in Toronto, Canada as VP of Public Relations.  


New Design Group is an outstandingly motivated and sought after branding specialist company with expertise in brand identity development, website design, SEM, SEO, and Social Media campaign management.  View the New Design Group website http://www.newdesigngroup.ca or visit the Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/NewDesignGroup

Online Destinations that Influence a Consumer to Buy

According to new research, there are three places online that are most likely to influence a consumer to make a purchase:

  • "Retail" websites like Lawyers.comSM
  • "Brand" websites, like a law firm's site
  • Blogs

Also topping the list were Facebook, and online forums and groups like Ask a Lawyer. The new findings in theTechnorati Media 2013 Digital Influence Report confirm that the best way for lawyers to attract new clients online is to market around the way that consumers behave.

Technorati is an Internet search engine for searching blogs. It surveyed 6,000 "influencers" (bloggers), 1,200 consumers and 150 top brand marketers. "Brand managers report an expected increase in budgets for digital marketing in the upcoming year," Technorati reported.

Retail websites

Consumers love to go to retail websites like Amazon.com or Zappos.com - online shopping centers where people can find many brands. In this sense, Lawyers.com, which gets more than 6 million page views per month, is a "retail" site - where consumers can find tens of thousands of lawyer profiles.

On Lawyers.com, consumers can easily find out many lawyers' expertise, website and contact information, and can compare attorneys by peer and client ranking. Online reviews can be a great source of new clients. Lawyers.com andmartindale.com® are the top online directories used by consumers who sought an attorney in the past year, according to the Attorney Selection Research Study by The Research Intelligence Group (TRiG).

Brand websites

In contrast, a "brand" website displays information about one kind of product or service, like Microsoft or Google. A brand website is an online store, the digital equivalent of an Apple store at a shopping mall.

"Today's consumers are increasingly comfortable going online to find answers for all kinds of issues, including legal ones," says Samantha Miller, vice president of product, Web Visibility Solutions, LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell. "Law firm websites need to capture consumers' attention and engage them, while serving as part of a larger marketing campaign."

There's no doubt that attorney websites still matter. More than one in three potential consumers of legal services turn to law firm websites to find a lawyer, and 26 percent have checked out a firm's website in order to validate an attorney, according to the TRiG research.

Lawyer blogs

It's clear to see why blogs also influence people to make a purchase. Consumers begin their search for a lawyer by researching their legal issue. The ideal place for them to learn a particular aspect of the law is on an attorney blog. And once a consumer has read a good blog post, who better to call than the lawyer who wrote it?

To learn more about what we can do for you and get a free Website Evaluation and Consultation, contact a LexisNexis Law Firm Marketing Specialist.

Video is the Killer App to Get Found in Google

There is a "killer app" that will greatly improve the likelihood that potential clients will find you in a Google search.  Research confirms that it is online video, and many lawyers have gotten the message. Just pay a visit to the LawyersDotCom channel you YouTube and check out the 500+ lawyer videos.

Video is the No. 1 reason that people go online, according to Pew Internet Research.  Clients and potential clients would rather watch to a two-minute verbal explanation than read a two-page article. "I don't want anything on paper. I don't have an in-box; if I did everything in it would go into trash. I want something that will catch my eye in 30 seconds or less, certainly not a long block of text. I'm more likely to look at a video," said MeMe Rasmussen, VP and Chief Privacy officer of Adobe Systems Inc.

Consider this:

  • More than 4 billion videos are viewed on YouTube every day.
  • Video is the easiest way to a first-page ranking on Google. A website with video is 53 times more likely to be found on the first page of Google compared with a website without video, according to Forrester.
  • Statistics show that having a video on your law firm website increases the chances that a potential client will retain you, and increases the time a visitor spends on your website.

Therefore it is surprising that only 51% of lawyers in firms of 1-5 lawyers say they plan to use video in their online marketing, according to a LexisNexis/Vizibility survey of law firm use of social media. The lack of video on your law firm website is a marketing mistake.

"Lawyers should develop an introductory video that showcases their personality as well as expertise. Post the video on the Web, including YouTube. Our studies have shown that a well-produced video can be a primary factor in a consumer's decision to contact a firm," says my colleague Craig McGuire, Product Marketing Manager, Websites/SEO/SEM at LexisNexis.

A small firm that is harnessing video effectively is Tully Rinckey of Albany, New York.  The firm's videos have been viewed more than 140,000 times - an outstanding result for a law firm. Many are clips from TV news reports in which a station interviewed a lawyer for comment about current events. Chief Marketing Officer Graig Cortelyou has cultivated good relations with local TV producers who give him these videos for free.  The 33-lawyer firm also displays a video on its home page.

 

Tips for a good video

Recording a video is easy and can be done right in your office. An experienced videographer will have the camcorder, lights and lavaliere microphones that are required. I recommend that you do not write a script and read it word-for-word from a teleprompter. All you need are a set of bullet points to follow, as you would use when making a presentation.

Click Here for Information on LexisNexis® Personal Video Production

To create a video that generates new business, follow these tips:

  • Don't talk about yourself. Clients are more interested in their legal issue than your credentials. Instead, talk about the problems you solve for clients.
  • Keep your video short: 2-3 minutes tops. Any longer and you'll lose your viewers.
  • Get to the point in 8 seconds or else viewers will move on.
  • The more light the better. Do not rely on sunlight or office light, which will produce dark and off-color videos.   
  • Move when you speak, because video is designed to capture action. Most lawyer videos show someone sitting at a desk, which is boring. Try standing up and gesturing when you speak, which is how you talk to people in person.
  • Mind the background. What is seen behind you makes a big difference. Do not sit in front of your office window or a lamp, which will put your face into a shadow. There should be no distracting cars or people moving in the background. Get rid of the clutter too.

One thing is clear: video is the future of law firm marketing. Adding video to your website is like getting an audition with a potential client. Don't delay in bringing your website up to date. 

 

Finding Yourself Can Be Harder than it Seems

This is an interesting post by Brian Farrell, one of LexisNexis' Law Marketing Specialists, that includes helpful information to get you ranked higher in your name's search results.

If you Google the name Brian Farrell, you'll find a lot of "us." There's Brian Farrell the Artist, Brian Farrell the Doctor, Brian Farrell the Lawyer, Brian Farrell the Harvard Professor and Brian Farrell the Irish Footballer. And then, there's me, and many, many others.

Among all of these other Brian Farrells, it's critical to me that my name appears at the top of search results. Not an easy task when competing against professional athletes and distinguished Ivy League professors! I've spend a lot of time working on this, and so should you. You want potential clients to find you, not the person with an identical name who lives halfway across the country. And while "Brian" and "Farrell" are both relatively common names, even attorneys with more unusual names may share those with others.

So how do you set yourself apart online from those with names exactly, or almost exactly, like yours? It will take some research and a small investment, but the results will help secure your online identity.

First, buy your name as a domain name, and then grab your Twitter handle. Next, customize your Facebook URL and your LinkedIn profile URL (replacing the random string of numbers with your own name). If you haven't done this already, you may find that the obvious ones have already been taken, particularly websites that end with the .com extension or @YourName on Twitter. If that's the case, try to snatch up domain names that end with .net, .name or .me as an alternative. You should consider taking www.YourNameSucks.com while you are at it, as a preventative measure. Many of these will be free, such as LinkedIn and Twitter, but you will have to pay for domain names. However, the fees are nominal, and once you "own" them, they are yours as long as you keep renewing them.

There are also free services, such as www.knowem.com, that will help you identify different extensions and domain name availability, as well as searching the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office database.

If you find that the obvious names have been taken, you will need to consider Plan B, or even Plan C. For example, seek out domain names that include your middle initial or your full name with your practice area or location (but don't use your city or state if you don't plan to practice there a long time), such as www.JohnDoeLawyer.com.

Throughout all of your social media activity, remember to abide by the rules of the state bars where you practice. And stay up to date on rulings and ethics opinions, since this is an area that is quickly changing.

Next, figure out which of these names you want to use to market yourself. You don't need to create a website for each of the URLs you secure — you just want to make sure no one else uses them. You can always redirect your chosen URL to your Lawyers.comSM profile, too. Once you have settled on one URL, Twitter handle, personalized LinkedIn page and business Facebook profile, be sure to use those consistently to brand yourself.   

Read original post here.

8 Ways to Use Your Law Firm Website to Turn Browsers Into Buyers

Once again, The Rainmaker Blog publishes a compelling post. Many times you will have window shoppers on your website, read below for 8 ways to turn those browsers into buyers.

1. Position your firm as a specialist. When people search for attorneys online they have a specific problem (DUI, personal injury, etc) and they are searching for specific answers. If your firm has more than one practice area, the best practice is to have more than one website, especially if they have a very different clientele.

2. Offer free, educational information. Only a small percentage of website visitors are ready to commit to a consultation the first time they visit your website. Providing visitors with educational materials to help them make the best decision is a tried and true technique in Internet marketing. If you are an estate planning attorney, give them a free report on the "Top 10 Questions to Ask Before You Hire an Estate Planning Attorney."

3. Use fitting photos. Almost every legal website makes the mistake of using the same photo of the scales of justice or the courthouse steps. Be sure the pictures on your website are congruent with your message and your perfect client.

4. Give visitors easy ways to connect with you. I'm still astounded at how difficult many websites make it just to find their phone number or an email address that goes directly to an individual versus a "faceless entity." Make it easy for prospects to find all your contact information, even on their cell phone.

5. Create a mobile friendly site. Last year smart phones outsold computers! With slower speeds, smaller screens, the need for more immediate information, and the potential desire to easily call your office directly from their cell, a mobile version of your website is no longer a nicety, it is a necessity!

6. Tell visitors what the next steps are. If you want them to download your free report or call your office for a free consultation, tell them!

7. Use video clips on your website. Video is a proven converter. It gives visitors a way to see you as a real person, to hear in your own words how you can help them, and how you are distinct in your approach.

8. Provide a clear and compelling reason why you are different from your competitors. Online buyers of legal services visit an average of 5 websites prior to moving into the decision making phase. Explain to them in an easy to understand manner how your firm is different from others.

 

LFM Second Annual AmLaw 200 and Global 100 Mobile Web Survey

Global 100 firms with mobile sitesThis is a guest blog post by The Law Firm Mobile (LFM) blog. In December, LFM released its second annual research on which firms from the AmLaw 200 and Global 100 have entered the world of the mobile web (the first report can be found here).

Below are following sections: an overview of the report, statistics describing the extent of mobile web site penetration for large law firms, statistics regarding the type of content used in firm web sites, and a final section on mobile web best practices. The final section of this report provides a detailed list of the names of law firms with hyper links to a screen shot of each respective firm’s mobile site along with the URL for that site.

Overview

  • Of the firms on the 2012 AmLaw 200 list, 54 firms (27%) have mobile sites. This is an increase of 46% (17 additional firms) from 2011. Of the firms on the 2012 Global 100 list, 29 firms (29%) have mobile sites. This is an increase of 32% (7 additional firms) from 2011.
  • Of the firms on the 2012 AmLaw 200 or Global 100 list with a mobile websites, most firms (67%) have from 7-9 total content types for the mobile site.
  • Of the firms on the 2012 AmLaw 200 or Global 100 list with a mobile website, the most popular type of content offered to users is Professionals/Attorney Biographies (59), Offices (53), and Practice Areas (52). The next set of content includes News (45), About the Firm (42), Careers (40), Events (38), and Publications (34). Some of the least used content types included Contact Us (13) and Industries (9).
  • Even with the increase in firms with mobile sites, the majority of large law firms in the AmLaw 200/Global 100 do not yet have a mobile web despite the significant growth in smartphone use.

See the remainder of LFM's findings on the LFM blog here.

 

Bankruptcy Lawyer Sees New Business from Participation in Online Legal Advice Forum

LexisNexis recently spoke with David L. Gibbs, senior associate attorney for The Gibbs Law Firm, APC, a bankruptcy, business and real estate firm in San Clemente, Calif. Gibbs is an active participant in Lawyers.com'S Ask A Lawyer.

LexisNexis® Martindale-Hubbell®: Can you tell me about your law practice? Who are your typical clients and how does a new client typically find you?

David L. Gibbs: Our clients are primarily homeowners in our small town in South Orange County, Calif., who experience problems with their homes or other real estate they own. Most of it is residential foreclosure activity. The single biggest driver of our business is word of mouth, because it is such a small community.

But more and more we are receiving leads from online sources, including Lawyers.com and the Ask A Lawyer section on Lawyers.com.

LNMH: How long have you been participating on Ask A Lawyer?

DLG: It's been almost a year.

LNMH: I heard that you've gotten several new clients as a result of your Ask A Lawyer work. Some of the other attorneys I've talked to have told me that lawyers shouldn't expect to get new business from Ask A Lawyer because its primary benefit is search engine optimization. Why do you think you've had success in driving new business where others haven't?

DLG: It's probably a combination of factors: The sheer number of answers I'm providing and the areas of law where I'm posting.

LNMH: What about the other benefits you've seen from your participation? You mentioned the links back to your website.

DLG: I haven't tried to quantify the search engine optimization benefits. I have gone into Google Webmaster Tools, looked at the profile for our website and seen click-thrus from Lawyers.com to our site, so I assume it's working. I just have to think that just being on Lawyers.com and posting frequently is helping drive traffic to our website.

LNMH: How much time do you spend in the average week answering questions on Ask A Lawyer?

DLG: I'm not on there daily, but when I do get on, I usually spend about an hour at a shot, and I do that a couple times a week. So probably two to three hours a week.

LNMH: Are you doing this during office hours or on your own time?

DLG: Mostly during office hours. For example, I'll jump on if I have a half an hour free and don't have time to start something new. Or if it's slow, I'll go onto Lawyers.com and spend an hour or so answering questions.

LNMH: What's the strangest or most memorable question you've ever answered?

DLG: [Laughter]

LNMH: The laugh makes me think there must be one or two.

DLG: There are tons of them. I'd have to say that landlord-tenant law is the most frequent source of weird questions. They're all over the map. It seems that about half of the questions are comical in some respect. Not comical in the sense of making fun of people, but weird stuff happens in that arena. You hear about landlords peeping on their tenants or walking into apartments without any advance notice.

LNMH: Understanding that you probably don't want the competition, would you recommend Ask A Lawyer to a colleague with whom you weren't competing?

DLG: Absolutely. It's a great tool and the fact that it's still free is fantastic.

Ask A Lawyer is a good resource for consumers. And although the search engine optimization benefits are hard to quantify, it can't be a bad thing for attorneys.

LNMH: What advice would you give to other attorneys who want to participate on Ask A Lawyer?

DLG: Limit yourself to areas where you know the law. On other online legal advice forums, I've seen attorneys taking guesses on answers in areas where they don't practice. Don't do that, you look like an idiot. Focus on what you know.

Second, be human. I've seen responses on other online legal advice forums where attorneys seem very condescending and are talking above their audience.

Finally, jump in and get going. It's very easy to do.